MEMORIAL WALL
We will never forget

The Memorial Wall is a memorial to honor those individuals who lost their lives in the line of duty and/or succumbed to job-related injuries within five years of their retirement.

The Memorial is located in a landscaped island directly east of the County of Los Angeles Fire Department’s Fire Command & Control Facility at 1320 North Eastern Avenue, Los Angeles.

The Memorial Wall has proven to be a tremendous honor to those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. It has given the families of those firefighters a sense that although they no longer have a loved one among them, there is a place where their names are engraved for all who pass by the Memorial Wall to see and remember the tremendous sacrifice they made and the future challenges it cost their families.

LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

This memorial wall consists of the Firefighters who gave their lives while on duty.
See the Job Related page for Firefighters who lost their lives due to job related illnesses or other job related complications.

IN MEMORIAM

LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Ocean Lifeguard Specialist Brian Kutil, 2015

Ocean Rescue

<< READ MORE ABOUT KUTIL>>

Captain
David Bailey, 2012

Heart Attack

<< READ MORE ABOUT BAILEY>>

THE STATION FIRE 2009

THE STATION FIRE – CAMP 16

 

THE STATION FIRE – CAMP 16

The following images are the view from Camp 16 as the fire approached

BIOGRAPHY OF
FIRE CAPTAIN
TEDMUND D. HALL

Fire Captain Hall joined the Los Angeles County Fire Department on April 22, 1981, as a student worker.

Like many young students seeking a career in the fire service, he supported the department’s mission in this capacity before being accepted into the Fire Academy in 1983. Captain Hall graduated from the Academy on September 10, 1983, as a member of the 65th Recruit Class. Upon graduation, he joined the crew at Fire Station 122 serving the City of Lakewood.

In March of 1984, he transferred to Fire Station 28 in Whittier. In October 1985, he joined the crew of Fire Station 43 in La Puente. In December of 1987, he joined the department’s Command and Control Team of fire dispatchers until November of 1988, when he was promoted to the rank of Fire Fighter Specialist.

Captain Hall served as an Engineer for 12 years at various locations, including Fire Stations 149, 165, 90, Camp 2 and Camp 11. In January of 2001, he was promoted to Fire Captain and served at Fire Stations 73, 11 and 33.

His last assignment was Camp 16 in the Palmdale region, where he was assigned in May of 2001.

Fire Captain Hall is survived by his wife Katherine, sons Randall, 21, and Steven, 20, along with his parents Roland Ray and Donna Marie Hall.

BIOGRAPHY OF
FIRE FIGHTER SPECIALIST
ARNALDO “ARNIE” QUINONES

Fire Fighter Specialist Quinones joined the Los Angeles County Fire Department on August 6, 1998, as a member of the department’s call fire fighter program. He was assigned to Fire Station 84 in Quartz Hill, where he remained until November 2000 when he was accepted into the Fire Academy as a member of the 104th Recruit Class.

Upon graduating in February of 2001, he was assigned to Fire Station 24 in the City of Palmdale. In August of 2001, he transferred to Fire Station 153 in Covina.

In March of 2002, he returned to Fire Station 24 and served there until November of 2003, when he transferred to Fire Station 82 in the City of La Canada Flintridge.

In December of 2005, he was promoted to the rank of Fire Fighter Specialist, at which time he joined the crew at Camp 16 — his last assignment.

Fire Fighter Specialist Quinones is survived by his wife Loressa, who is expecting their first child within the next several weeks, his mother Sonia Del Valle, his brother Ozzie Quinones Jr., and numerous nieces and nephews.

Daniel E. Elkins, 2004

Traffic accident

<<READ MORE ABOUT ELKINS>>

Inmate Martin Stiles, 1999

Fall injuries

<< READ MORE ABOUT STILES>>

Inmate Brian Carrasco, 1998

Vehicle Rollover

<< READ MORE ABOUT CARRASCO>>

Last Alarm: August 30, 1998

An Inmate from Crew 16-2 was killed in a vehicle rollover that occured on 90th Street East in the Littlerock area.
The crew was responding to multiple lightning strikes that were occurring in the area.

Kenneth E. Bayer, 1997

Cardiac Arrest

<< READ MORE ABOUT BAYER>>

Dale R. Weiss, 1995

 

<< READ MORE ABOUT WEISS>>

Raymond E. Eichert, 1994

Fall from hosetower

Jeff Langley, 1993

The “Cowboy Firefighter” 
Firefighter Paramedic Jeff Langley Remembered
Last Alarm March 30, 1993 
From LACo Fire Website

With a worldwide legacy of improving helicopter-based delivery of emergency medical and swiftwater rescue services, Fire Fighter Paramedic Jeff Langley was honorably remembered by our Department on March 28, the twentieth anniversary of his untimely passing at the young age of 28. Langley, affectionately known by his colleagues as the “cowboy firefighter” for his love of horses and rodeo roping, lost his life on March 30, 1993, when he fell from the skid of a helicopter during an emergency medical rescue in Malibu while assigned to Air Squad 8. However, both his life and death have since served to save countless lives of both civilians and first responders over the past two decades.

“Twenty years ago we lost a very important person in our family,” said Battalion Chief Steve Martin who served as emcee of the celebration of life. “But his spirit, his work ethic and everything else that surrounded him have continued to this day.”

At the age of four Langley announced to his mother Karen that he was going to be a firefighter, and that calling in him never wavered. After working as a Fire Suppression Aide at Camp 2 for two years, he was officially hired as a firefighter with our Department in 1983, where he became part of the pioneering group of LACoFD employees who developed the “Helo-Swiftwater Rescue” procedures and equipment now being used around the world by the global rescue community. Langley’s tragic passing initiated a number of new safety procedures for Air Operations personnel, including a life-size helicopter prop at Barton Heliport in Pacoima which has been used by not only LACoFD personnel, but thousands of firefighters from all over the State to train in copter-based rescue operations. In fact, the international Higgins and Langley Memorial Awards administered by the National Association for Search and Rescue Swiftwater Rescue Committee, were partially named in his honor.

The ceremony, held at Air Operations in Pacoima, began with the traditional posting of the colors and pledge of allegiance by the Department’s Honor Guard in front of the helicopter prop and he helped develop. Fire Chief Daryl Osby then followed with a tribute to Langley. “I often say that the Los Angeles County Fire Department is not known for its greatness because of our size, but because of the individuals that have worked here and contribute to the history of this organization, and Jeff Langley is no different,” said Osby. “I remember working with him when he was a firefighter in the beginnings of our urban search and rescue (USAR) team. He was instrumental in volunteering and helping with the initial guidelines and now we have a USAR team that’s known across the nation and around the world. Jeff’s contributions have made that team what it is today. Even after Jeff’s unfortunate passing, he’s still contributing to this organization and the fire service as a whole. He’s still in our hearts and his commitment to this organization still lives today.”

Fire Fighter Layne Contreras, who worked as Langley’s partner, noted to the attendees that he was privileged to have been on the last rescue mission with Langley and felt that he had left our Department a better place. Battalion Chief Larry Collins also spoke of Langley’s contributions to our USAR and swiftwater operations, before reading from Los Angeles Times writer Al Martinez’s piece “A Cross Hangs in the Sky,” written in tribute to Langley just after his passing.

Following these tributes, Langley’s mother Karen Langley-Stephen took to the podium to offer her thanks, as well as some words of wisdom to the firefighters in attendance. “Jeff is known best as a hard worker, a great storyteller and a good friend. He worked hard and he played hard,” she said. “I think what I take away from everything he did, whether work related or play related, was that he challenged himself and this was a very important thing to do. When you challenge yourself you keep the bar raised high. You can’t disappoint yourself, because then you let everybody else down. So keep that bar raised high, and challenge yourself, no matter whether it’s work or play.”

At the end of the ceremony, the sounds of a helicopter fly-over intermingled with the solemn notes of “Amazing Grace” played on the bagpipes, a remembrance that though Langley is no longer with us, his work will continue to save the lives of others into the future. “His spirit sees off these helicopters as they take off every morning and come back every day,” said Collins. “And when the USAR teams heads out to anywhere in the country or around the world, he’s seeing everybody off, safely.”

Arthur Ruezga, 1993

Burned – brushfire

<< READ MORE ABOUT RUEZGA>>

Kenneth A. Boyd, 1986

Electrocution – construction

Gary W. Maiben 1981

Traffic accident

John O. Taylor, 1978

Heart Attack

Christopher D. Herman, 1993

Burned – brushfire

<< READ MORE ABOUT HERMAN>>

JOSEPH J. HISEL, JR, 1983

Electrocution – construction

James W. Michelli, 1979

Suffocated – structure fire

James E. Howe, 1991

Structure fire – collapse

<< READ MORE ABOUT HOWE>>

SALVADOR A. TORRES, 1982

Traffic accident

Timothy Rodriguez, 1979

Heat Stroke

Wellesley G. Hartman. 1976

Struck by a rock – brushfire

<< READ MORE ABOUT HARTMAN>>

Thomas Paul Grady, 1977

Thomas Paul Grady, 32 years old,  worked for Air America, Inc. from May 29, 1968 until his separation form the company on June 30, 1975. He was a rotary-wing aircraft pilot and was based out of Saigon, South Vietnam. Upon his return to civilian life he became a helicopter pilot with the Los Angeles County Fire Department.On the night of July 24, 1977, a Los Angeles County Fire helicopter (LACO 14, a Bell 205A-1) and the USFS Rose Valley helicopter (H-29, A Bell 212) collided mid-air while inbound to the Mill Creek Heliport on the Angeles National Forest. At the time of the crash, both helicopters were involved in night firefighting activities, dropping water on the Middle Fire and were under contract with the United States Forest Service. Pilots of both helicopters were operating with Night Vision Goggles (NVG). Radio frequencies were saturated, and the pilots had trouble communicating with the helibase manager. The County helicopter (a Bell 205A-1) was piloted by Thomas Grady and Theodore Hellmers, both employees of the Los Angeles County Fire Department. The helicopters collided while being maneuvered to land. Grady was killed in the collision and Hellmers suffered severe injuries. (Litigation went on for years.) The two pilots of the Forest Service helicopter (a Bell 212) were also injured but not so severely. The Middle Fire was 3800 acres.​

Last Alarm: July 24, 1977 – 2230 hours – pilot for LA County Fire, under contract with the USFS, flying a Bell 205 helicopter owned by Arizona Helicopters

Peter D. Miller, 1974

Struck by a car

 

STANLEY W. SCHNABEL. 1972

Suffocated – structure fire

 

Crewman Alga Jones, 1960

Hit by rock

<< READ MORE ABOUT JONES>>

Philip B. Goodell, 1968

Burned – brushfire

<< READ MORE ABOUT GOODELL>>

Fireman Specialist George Thomas, 1968

Burn injuries

Fireman Specialist George Thomas, age 36, and his men from Crew 4-4 died of burn injuries while fighting the 19,100 acre “Canyon Inn Fire” located above Glendora.

Crew 4-4 Last Alarm August 23, 1968
  • Duane Battle, age 17
  • Earl Walzer
  • William Rodriguez
  • Arthur Mendible
  • Robert Rivera
  • Gregory Banks
  • Larry Carlin

FIRE CHIEF CECIL R. GEHR, 1953

FIRE CHIEF 1992 -1993
Traffic Accident on the way to a fire

Fire Chief Cecil Gehr was killed in a vehicle accident while responding to the “Gold Fire”. This was a 306 acre fire that was located in Little Tujunga Canyon.

Last Alarm: July 14, 1957

This was as stunning loss for the Department, the fire service, and County residents.

 

Glenn Rockey, 1955

Burn injuries

Captain Glenn Rockey of LACoFD Engine 4 died of burn injuries while fighting the 1150 acre “Hacienda Fire”. He was attempting to rescue five members of Crew 5-1. The Crew also succumbed to burn injuries.

The devastating event propelled changes in the way brush fires are currently fought.

Crew 5-1 Last Alarm: September 2, 1955

Seventeen Years Old

  • Gregory Sambrano
  • La Verne Pendergast
  • Terry Kelly

Sixteen Years Old

  • Franklyn Fay
  • William Strack

Photo from video of the Hacienda Fire Memorial Dedication Ceremony in the City of La Habra Heights.

Edward J. Duffy, 1947

Burned – brush fire

<< READ MORE ABOUT DUFFY>>

Denleigh W. Wood, 1935

Heart Attack

Ray Metz, 1929

Tractor Accident

<< READ MORE ABOUT METZ>>

Robert A. Combs, 1942

Burned – structure fire

Ray Taylor, 1930

Burned – Brushfire

<< READ MORE ABOUT TAYLOR>>

Bert F. Hancock, 1938

Fall – structure fire

GEORGE C. ELSEY, 1931

Electrocution – pole fire

Clyde Radenmacher, 1929

Struck by a falling tree

GRANITE MOUNTAIN HOTSHOTS
LAST ALARM: JUNE 30TH, 2013

Los Angeles County Fire Museum’s Own
KEVIN WOYJECK
GRANITE MOUNTAIN HOTSHOT

Chief Melendez & Kevin on his El Camino Fire Academy Graduation Day

The sacrifice of public service; “Esse Quam Videri” shares the story of our 19 Heroic Firefighters.
The movie “Esse Qaum Videri” is presented with the permission of Chris Woods, Director.

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